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In parts I and II, we’ve talked about what virtual memory is, and how to monitor virtual memory on Linux.

Why is Solaris any different? Two reasons: (1) it virtualizes the swap space, and includes unused parts of physical memory as swap space, and (2) it maintains the distinction between paging and swapping.

These two factors often give rise to confusion and misinterpretation of the data, especially when queried via SNMP. Read more »


For those of you using our MongoDB monitoring, there’s an update for replication monitoring.file000498837754

There’s a few improvements over the prior datasource: it deals with authentication better; removes some assumptions about whether members of a replica set are running on common ports, etc. Most of the data points being monitored are standard, and don’t need much comment. (We find all the members; monitor their health, state, uptime, etc). Read more »


Alerts around the Campfire

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As we’ve often preached – too many alerts are just as bad as missing alerts. You don’t want your team to become inured to alerts, so they don’t take action on those indicating outages.

For those of you using Campfire as your team collaboration tool, you now have another way to help manage your infrastructure and server monitoring alerts, and ensure every alert is reacted to appropriately.  LogicMonitor now integrates with Campfire using the Campfire API.

How does this integration help you react to alerts appropriately, and ensure your teams don’t suffer from alert overload? Read more »


SSD Stats[Written by Perry Yang, Technical Operations Engineer at LogicMonitor]

In recent years, Solid-State Drives or SSDs have become a standard part of data center architecture. They handle more simultaneous read/write operations than traditional disks and use a fraction of the power. Of course, as a leading infrastructure, software and server monitoring platform vendor, we are very interested in monitoring our SSDs, not only because we want to make sure we’re getting what we paid for, but because we would also like to avoid a disk failure on a production machine at 3:00AM in the morning…and the Shaquille O’Neal sized headache to follow. But how do we know for sure if our SSDs are performing the way we want them to? Being one of the newest members of our technical operations team, it came as no surprise that I was tasked to answer this question. Read more »

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In a prior blog post, I talked about what virtual memory is, the difference between swapping and paging, and why it matters. (TL;DR: swapping is moving an entire process out to disk; paging is moving just specific pages out to disk, not an entire process. Running programs that require more memory than the system has will mean pages (or processes) are moved to/from disk and memory in order to get enough physical memory to run – and system performance will suck.)

Now I’ll talk about how to monitor virtual memory, on Linux (where it’s easy) and, next time, on Solaris (where most people and systems do it incorrectly.) Read more »


Hi everyone,

BeforeLogicMonitor Monitoring Roundtable the July 4th holiday, we had the opportunity to host our second LogicMonitor Monitoring Roundtable.

During this session, Mike Aracic, a senior datasource developer here at LogicMonitor, gave us insight into creating datasources for your environment and provided some resources for further education. Read more »


Monitoring Roundtable We’ve launched a new program here at LogicMonitor to help you get insight from us and from your compatriots at different corporations working in different positions solving complexities and issues with LogicMonitor. Here at LogicMonitor, we are referring to this fledgling program as the Monitoring Roundtable. We are looking to have one of these every month with invitations extended by your account managers. Of course, you are welcome to be proactive and reach out to us or to your account manager directly for an invitation. Read more »


Don’t Get Trapped by Traps

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[Originally appeared April 30, 2014  in the Packet Pushers online community, written by Steve Francis, Founder and Chief Product Officer with LogicMonitor. This is a continuation of the 'SNMP traps' blog post previously posted on the LogicMonitor blog.]

LogicMonitor is a SaaS-based IT infrastructure monitoring company, monitoring the performance, capacity and availability of thousands of different kinds of devices and applications for thousands of customers. Where possible, we don’t rely on SNMP traps – and neither should you.

2014-05-07_10-59-14

Firstly, consider what a trap is – a single UDP datagram, sent from a device to notify you that something is going wrong with that device. Now, UDP (User Datagram Protocol) packets are, unlike TCP, not acknowledged, and not retransmitted if they get lost on the network and don’t arrive, since the sender has no way of knowing if it arrived or not. So, a trap is a single, unreliable notification, sent from a device at the exact time that a UDP packet is least likely to make it to the management station – as, by definition, something is going wrong. The thing going wrong may be causing spanning tree to re-compute, or routing protocols to reconverge, or interface buffers to reset due to a switchover to redundant power supply. Not the time to rely on a single packet to tell you about critical events. Traps are just not a reliable means to tell you of things that can critically affect your infrastructure – this is the main reason to avoid them if possible.

Read more »


What is virtual memory, anyway?

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I was going to write about the differences between monitoring virtual memory on Linux and Solaris, but figured it would be beneficial to start with some fundamentals about what virtual memory is, and the differences between Solaris and Linux.LogicMonitor_-_prod3la_-_Dashboard

Virtual memory is used by all current operating systems. It simply means that the memory address a program requests is virtualized – not necessarily related to a physical memory address.  The program may request the content of memory address 1000; the computer looks at where the current map for address 1000 is pointing, and returns the contents of that address. (Virtual address 1000 may be mapped to physical address 20.)  Of course, if the memory is virtualized, that means that there is no need to actually have physical memory on the server for every address the programs think they can address – so the programs can believe the server to have more memory than it physically does.  Virtual memory addresses do not need to be mapped to anything until they are allocated by a program.  And a virtual memory address can be mapped not to a physical block of memory for storage, but to a block on a hard drive. Read more »


[Originally appeared April 16, 2014 on the OneLogin blog; guest blog post written by Annie Dunham, Director of Product Management, LogicMonitor.]

IT managers either adopt a DevOps philosophy or think it’s passé. Either way, it’s hard to argue with the foundational principle that IT automation isn’t just a trend but rather a key tenant of today’s IT Ops environment. When done right, automation brings efficiency to IT teams.

Automation

At LogicMonitor  – OneLogin’s newest integration partner that offers infrastructure performance monitoring via it’s SaaS-based platform — it’s often said that “the best way to get a promotion is to automate your way out of a job.” You may wonder what the reasoning is for this and it’s simple: automating manual tasks is fundamental to the LogicMonitor product philosophy. A team that monitors thousands of data points each day are also testing new data centers, adding equipment vendors, and performing the laundry list of daily IT Ops responsibilities. Efficiency isn’t nice to have — it’s a requirement!

Our integration with OneLogin reduces the time required for user management configuration by over 50%, as the integration completely removes the need to manage users and security policies within LogicMonitor.

Read more »


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